Experiments in papercutting – II...

Jul 10, 2013 by

I’m working on an idea for a new book with paper-cut illustrations. Even though my concept is for a digital book, I like the idea of using paper-cut pictures because it gives it a more 3D feel than the flatness you sometimes get with digital art. Doing it this way, I also have the freedom to move the pieces around, like a puppeteer. It’s a little time-consuming, but entertaining process. Looks like somebody’s angry, huh? I was a little scared myself, when I finished. Poor kid! What do you think? Let’s see what comes out of it.  Stay tuned for more! P.S If you’re curious about how the first papercutting experiment went, go here....

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Keeping it simple: paper, pen & ink...

Jul 2, 2013 by

When I started illustrating, one of the first mediums I was drawn to (pardon the pun :)) experiment with was pen and ink. There is something so classic about black and white, and the intensity and energy of black strokes on paper; I love it. Probably the most basic way of working with pen and ink is the humble dip pen. It is also the most inexpensive start to trying out a medium– basic nibs cost approximately 20-50 cents/12-30 rupees each. If you use them a lot they do wear out pretty quickly, but luckily getting replacements isn’t costly or difficult. If you’re trying dip pens for the first time I encourage you to take a few different types of nibs so you can see the varied results you can get. I started out...

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Don’t forget to doodle & other sketchbook secrets...

Jun 7, 2013 by

Probably the best advice I’ve received about getting past creative blocks is (1) don’t underestimate doodling (2) always  keep a sketchbook. Doodling is such a freeing activity, and most of the time when you’re really stressed out over an idea or concentrating too hard, it feels like a lot of work. And the minute something feels like work, it gets less interesting and the results are, usually, disappointing. I guess that’s why everybody always talks about the importance of keeping your artwork fresh. For a person who got very self-critical when things didn’t turn out as I planned, doodling was a welcome break. I’ve found it hugely beneficial to doodle  because it’s a completely subconscious process. Since I don’t have a plan to start off with, it lands up being an exciting journey. Most...

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Afternoon delight: conferences & creative solutions to bland business cards...

Jun 6, 2013 by

If any of you attended a SCBWI conference, and more importantly if it was your first one, you probably stressed out about whether you should take business cards along. I certainly did when I attended the Western Washington chapter‘s conference a few weeks ago here in Seattle. I wasn’t sure if it would seem presumptuous (after all, it wasn’t like being a creator was my actual job to be handing business cards out) or awkward. I finally decided that it might be useful just because you meet so many people and it would be easier to hand cards out without having to fish out bits of paper to scrawl on instead. I was in such a dilemma: how many should I take with me? Will it be a waste to print? What if I decided...

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Experiments in negative space: Papercutting...

Mar 27, 2013 by

I grew up in a house full of exciting craft projects, thanks to my ridiculously talented mother. From marbling paper to making Christmas decorations, there was always some activity to partake in. Of course half the time my sister and I would sit dumbfounded watching Amma and wonder where she found the energy, patience and motivation to sit for hours on end working away painstakingly. I guess that’s why using only traditional illustration material like paints, pencils and crayons always felt incomplete to me. I craved making something with my hands — cutting, folding, pasting… I have so much respect and awe for what you can create just from paper. Amma has made everything from paper bags and boxes to photo frames with it. So I began to think about how I could illustrate...

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The (re)cycle of life and art

Mar 10, 2013 by

Our household gets a lot of cardboard and brown paper bags. From deliveries to packages, there is no dearth of us running down and up, to and from the recycling bins in our apartment complex. Given that I’m already obsessed with not wasting paper, and working on pieces and scraps till I have no white space left, it was only a matter of time before I decided to give cardboard a go. It makes complete sense. I don’t need to buy more paper. You can use any form of dry or wet media on it since it it’s thicker than most papers and much cheaper than using canvas. Well, free actually in this case. And I love the rough texture and color; it makes for a more interesting base to work with. Why didn’t...

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